Despite a steep drop in tax-related identity theft in recent years, the Internal Revenue Service warns taxpayers that the scam remains serious enough to earn a spot on the 2019 “Dirty Dozen” list of tax scams. “Taxpayers should continue to protect their sensitive tax and financial data to help protect against identity thieves,” IRS Commissioner

With the 2019 tax filing season in full swing, and April 15 only a few days away, the Internal Revenue Service has once again unveiled its annual list of the most prevalent tax scams facing taxpayers and tax professionals, which it calls the “Dirty Dozen.” Leading the “Dirty Dozen” for 2019 are internet-based “phishing” scams

Tomorrow is the annual deadline for the filing of individual income tax returns for calendar year 2017.  The Internal Revenue Service expects to receive approximately 32 million returns in the final days leading up to April 17.  In addition, the IRS expects to receive about 12 million last-minute requests for extensions of the April 17

The Internal Revenue Service has warned taxpayers to be wary of abusive tax shelters, which remain on the annual “Dirty Dozen” list of tax scams for 2018. These sophisticated schemes, particularly those involving micro-captive insurance shelters, can be peddled by promoters and others to avoid taxes.

Compiled annually by the IRS, the “Dirty Dozen” lists

As part of its annual “Dirty Dozen” list of tax scams, the Internal Revenue Service warned taxpayers of schemes that falsify income or involve phony Forms 1099. A common tax scam the IRS sees each year involves falsifying income in order to claim refundable credits, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit. Another frequent scheme

The Internal Revenue Service has issued a warning to taxpayers about using frivolous tax arguments to avoid paying taxes. Promoters of frivolous schemes encourage taxpayers to make unreasonable and outlandish legal claims to avoid paying their taxes. Such arguments have been repeatedly thrown out of court.

Compiled annually by the IRS, the “Dirty Dozen” lists